Smithsonian exhibit on display at MCHAM

Published 8:44 am Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Smithsonian Institution opened its newest museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture Sept. 24, 2016. The celebration continues and reaches beyond Washington, D.C., to Demopolis as the Marengo County History & Archives Museum at the Rosenbush Building presents “A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American History and Culture.” The commemorative poster exhibition is available to view now through Feb. 28 during regular museum hours.
“A Place for All People: Introducing the National Museum of African American History and Culture” is a commemorative poster exhibition celebrating the opening of the Smithsonian’s newest museum Sept. 24, 2016. Based on the inaugural exhibitions of the museum, the posters highlight key artifacts that tell the rich and diverse story of the African American experience. “A Place for All People” is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) in collaboration with the museum
Organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) in collaboration with the National Museum of African American History and Culture, “A Place for All People” highlights key artifacts that tell the rich and diverse story of the African American experience. From the child-size shackles of a slave and the clothing worn by Carolotta Walls on her first day at Little Rock Central High School to Chuck Berry’s Gibson guitar, “Maybellene,” and the track shoes worn by Olympian Carl Lewis, the exhibition presents a living history that reflects challenge, triumph, faith and hope.
The poster exhibition and related public programs are an opportunity for the Marengo County History & Archives Museum to showcase its work in sharing the many stories of African American and African diaspora people and their contributions to the local community and the American story. On Thursday, Feb. 23, the Marengo County History & Archives Museum will present a reception and program at 6 p.m. with keynote speaker, Dr. Maurice J. Hobson, assistant professor of African America Studies at Georgia State University. Dr. Hobson is the son of the Joy Hobson, and late Marvin V. Hobson, both educators in Selma. On Saturday, Feb. 25, from noon to 2 p.m., the museum will host a Roundtable Discussion: “Your Ancestors’ Contribution to the Community and American Society.” A light lunch will be provided.
The journey to establish the National Museum of African American History & Culture began a century ago with a call for a national memorial to honor the contributions of African American Civil War veterans. After decades of efforts by private citizens, organizations and members of Congress, federal legislation was passed in 2003 to create the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Since then, thousands of artifacts have been collected to fill the inspiring new building that has risen on the National Mall. Through its exhibitions and programs, the museum provides a shared lens to view the nation’s history and the possibility for hope and healing. It is a place where all can gather to remember, reflect and embrace America’s story: a place for all people. For more information, visit nmaahc.si.edu.
SITES has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for 65 years. SITES connects Americans to their shared cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play. For exhibition description and tour schedules, visit sites.si.edu.