Crawford: Small resolutions could have bigger impact

New Year’s resolutions are a tradition for many, signifying what they want to change about their lives for the better. But some find resolutions hard to keep.

Kate Crawford, a counselor at Bryan W. Whitfield Memorial Hospital, said she sees a lot of people unable to keep their resolutions and beating themselves up because of it.

“A lot of people are so hard on themselves because the resolutions usually revolve around them as an individual—usually like losing weight or making more money throughout the year,” she said.

As an alternative, Crawford suggested going for New Year’s resolutions that focus on something deeper in an individual’s life. While she did recognize the importance of many common resolutions, Crawford said something that could help them become a better person would likely have a higher rate of success because it is more meaningful.

“I think something small you could do that would make you a better person is a lot better of a resolution than something that in the end is going to make you feel worse about yourself,” she said.

A resolution may also be more successful with the help of a game plan, short-term goals set along the way and being specific about the desired result. Journaling and keeping track of things like the time frame, reasons for making the resolution, past obstacles and support systems can also help.

Crawford pointed that some may also struggle with losing steam throughout the year, but outside support can make a difference.

She even said that some resolutions may not last because they are not made in order to change someone’s life for the better, but simply because it is New Year’s.

“If you really want to see change, it’s going to take some work. It’s dedication.”

She reminded that one slip-up does not mean there’s no hope and that long-term goals are more of process rather than a string of perfect days. Above all, Crawford said “Be nice to yourself. Even if you mess up, it’s okay.”

(This article originally appeared in the Wednesday, December 26 issue of the Demopolis Times.)

 

 

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